The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act requires every higher education institution that receives any form of Federal funding to implement a drug and alcohol abuse prevention program (DAAPP). An annual notification of this information is to be provided in writing to each employee, and to each student who is taking one or more classes for any type of academic credit except for continuing education units, regardless of the length of the student’s program of study. 

The purpose of this program is to prevent the unlawful possession and abuse of alcohol and drugs. Colorado State University is concerned about the well-being of its community members and has embraced the expectations of the Drug-Free School and Communities Act. Below is the most recent version of the drug and alcohol abuse prevention program (DAAPP).  

Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program (DAAPP)

A .pdf version of the most recent DAAPP can be viewed and downloaded here

CSU Drug, Marijuana, Alcohol and Tobacco Policies 

CSU’s alcohol and drug policy applies to all members of the university community, including staff, faculty, students, affiliates, volunteers, and visitors.

The university prohibits the following on any university owned or controlled property, or at university activities:  

  • Illegally manufacturing, distributing, dispensing, possessing or using illicit drugs, including marijuana and its derivatives Possessing a medical marijuana permit does not allow for the possession, use or storage of marijuana anywhere on university property, including in residence halls and university apartments
    • Possessing, selling or using drug paraphernalia  
  • Anyone younger than 21 possessing or drinking alcohol on campus property 
  • Intentionally or knowingly selling or furnishing alcohol to anyone younger than 21, or anyone obviously inebriated  
  • Possessing or consuming alcohol or drugs, or being impaired by alcohol or drugs while:  
  • In a university laboratory, mechanical shop, or other place where the risks of    injury are higher than under normal circumstances  
  • Driving a university vehicle or machinery  
  • Performing university job duties  
  • Volunteering for the university  
  • Interacting with children while working or volunteering at the university or at a university sponsored event  
  • Students and employees may not use alcohol, controlled substances or illicit drugs so as to adversely affect academic or job performance, endanger the physical well‐being of themselves or others, or in a way that leads to property damage or serious misconduct. 
  • CSU does permit the lawful use of alcohol at events and in connection with activities on CSU property, such as tailgating home football games when following tailgating policies or at special events with permission and oversight from the university Office of Risk Management and Insurance.
    • The full text of CSU’s Alcohol and Drug policy is available online.
  • Except as specifically provided under limited exemptions from the full Smoking, Vaping, and Tobacco Use Policy, smoking or vaping of any substance, all uses of tobacco, and the sale of tobacco and other substances meant for smoking are prohibited in all buildings and on all grounds owned, leased, or controlled by CSU, including, but not limited to, green spaces, courtyards, breezeways, terraces, stairways and access ramps, outdoor plazas and patios, underpasses and recreational facilities and fields, roadways, walkways, sidewalks, and pick-up and drop-off points for campus and public bus transportation.

Alcohol and Drugs in Residence Halls

The possession or use of fermented malt beverages, intoxicating liquors, and illegal drugs is not permitted in any of the residence halls. This includes all students regardless of age. Alcoholic beverages may not be used by, possessed by, or distributed to any person under twenty-one (21) years of age. Use, abuse, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of illegal (under federal or state law) drugs including but not limited to marijuana, narcotics, methamphetamines, cocaine, opiates, LSD, mushrooms, heroin, designer drugs such as Ecstasy and GHB, or other controlled substances is prohibited. Use, abuse, or possession of prescription drugs other than for the person prescribed, or for use other than the prescribed purpose is prohibited. Abuse of over the counter drugs or inhalants is prohibited. Possession or use of drug paraphernalia including but not limited to equipment, products, and materials used to cultivate, manufacture, distribute, or use illegal drugs is also prohibited.

Medical and Recreational Marijuana in Residence Halls

The possession of a medical marijuana permit does not allow for the possession or use of marijuana in the residence halls. Marijuana obtained for medicinal purposes cannot be stored or used in the residence halls. Recreational marijuana use, possession, and distribution is also a violation of University Housing Policy and the Student Code of Conduct. These activities are illegal for persons under 21; for those 21 and older, these activities cannot occur on any University property. See more within the University Guidelines regarding Amendment 64 and Marijuana Use.

CSU Responsible Action Exemption Policy for Students

Students or organizations, both on and off campus, who seek medical attention for themselves or on behalf of another student related to the use of drugs or alcohol will not be charged with violations of the Student Conduct Code related to that incident.

  • The student seeking exemption for the emergency must comply with the recommendations of the Student Conduct Services hearing officer. These may include an assessment related to drug or alcohol use and treatment recommendations, among others.
  • Failure to complete an assessment may result in charges against the student filed with Student Conduct Services.
  • The parents or guardians of students may be notified by the university if a student involved in the situation is younger than 21 and was transported to the hospital for medical attention.

Applicable Legal Sanctions for the State of Colorado

ALCOHOL AND CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES – COLORADO SANCTIONS

         

Offense

Type of Offense

Jail Term/Penalties

Fine

Driver’s License

Alcohol consumption / possession: illegal under 21Unclassified petty offense24 – 36 hours community service;
substance abuse education program
$100 – $250Revoked
Juvenile DUI: Under 21 blood alcohol level (BAC) between .02 and .05
Zero tolerance law
Class A traffic infraction
Repeat offender = Class 2 Traffic misdemeanor
24 hours community service$15 to $100Revoked
Driving while impaired (DWAI) BAC .05 – .08Traffic misdemeanor1st offense: 2-180 days jail; 24-48 hours community service

2nd offense: 10-365 days; 48-120 hours community service; 2 years probation

3rd offense: 60-365 days; 48-120 hours community service; 2 years probation; alcohol education program
1st offense: $200 – $500



2nd offense: $600 – $1,500



3rd offense: $600 – $1,500
Revoked if under 21
Driving under the influence of ethyl alcohol BAC above .08Traffic misdemeanor1st offense: 5-365 days (if BAC > 0.2, then 10-365 days); 48-96 hours community service

2nd offense: 10-365 days; 48-120 hours community service; 2 years probation

3rd offenseor more: 60-365 days; 48-120 hours community service; alcohol education program, 2 years probation
1st offense: $600 – $1,000




2nd offense: $600 – $1,500



3rd offense +: $600 – $1,500
Revoked
Open alcohol containerClass A traffic infractionNone50None

CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES – COLORADO SANCTIONS

Possession

Schedule I and II, such as: cocaine, opium, heroin, morphine, methadone, LSD, mescaline, psilocybin, GHBLevel 4 drug felony – possession6 months – 1 year; 1 year parole period$1,000 – $100,000n/a
Schedule III, such as: PCP, Codeine, DiluadidLevel 1 drug misdemeanor – possession6 months – 18 months$500 – $5,000n/a
Schedule IV, such as: Chloral Hydrate, tranquilizers, some barbituates and stimulantsLevel 1 drug misdemeanor – possession6 months – 18 months$500 – $5,000n/a
Schedule V, such as Codeine and other narcoticsLevel 1 drug misdemeanor – possession6 months – 18 months$500 – $5,000n/a

Use

Schedule I, IILevel 2 drug misdemeanorNo imprisonment – 1 year$50 – $750n/a
Schedule III, IV, VLevel 2 drug misdemeanorNo imprisonment – 1 year$50 – $750n/a

Note: All controlled substances charges also include a drug offender surcharge in addition to fines listed.

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MARIJUANA – COLORADO SANCTIONS

         

Offense

Type of Offense

Jail Term/Penalties

Fine

Driver’s License

Providing marijuana to a minor
> 2.5 lbs (> 1 lb concentrate)Level 1 drug felony8 – 32 years, 3 year parole$5,000 – $1Mn/a
> 6 oz – 2.5 lbs (3 oz – 1 lb concentrate)Level 2 drug felony4 – 8 years, 2 year parole$3,000 – $750,000n/a
> 1 oz – 6 oz (.5 oz – 3 oz concentrate)Level 3 drug felony2 – 4 years, 1 year parole$2,000 – $500,000n/a
≤ 1 oz (≤ .5 oz concentrate)Level 4 drug felony6 months – 1 year, 1 year parole$1,000 – $100,000n/a
Manufacture or process without a license
Any amount of marijuana or concentrateLevel 3 drug felony2 – 4 years, 1 year parole$2,000 – $500,000n/a
Dispense, sell, distribute, or possess with intent
to manufacture, dispense, sell or distribute
50 lbs (> 25 lbs concentrate)Level 1 drug felony8 – 32 years, 3 year parole$5,000 – $1Mn/a
> 5 lbs – 50 lbs (> 2.5 lbs – 25 lbs concentrate)Level 2 drug felony4 – 8 years, 2 year parole$3,000 – $750,000n/a
> 12 oz – 5 lbs (> 6 oz – 2.5 lbs concentrate)Level 3 drug felony2 – 4 years, 1 year parole$2,000 – $500,000n/a
> 4 oz – 12 oz (> 2 oz – 6 oz concentrate)Level 4 drug felony6 months – 1 year, 1 year parole$1,000 – $100,000n/a
≤ 4 oz – 12 oz (≤ 2 oz concentrate)Level 1 drug misdemeanor6 – 18 months$500 – $5,000n/a
Possession of plants
> 30 plantsLevel 3 drug felony2 – 4 years, 1 year parole$2,000 – $500,000n/a
> 6 – 30 plantsLevel 4 drug felony6 months – 1 year, 1 year parole$1,000 – $100,000n/a
≤ 6 plantsLevel 1 drug misdemeanor6 – 18 months$500 – $5,000n/a
Possession
> 12 oz (> 3 oz concentrate)Level 4 drug felony6 months – 1 year, 1 year parole$1,000 – $100,000n/a
> 6 oz – 12 oz (<3 oz concentrate)Level 1 drug misdemeanor6 – 18 months$500 – $5,000n/a
> 2 oz – 6 ozLevel 2 drug misdemeanor0 – 12 months$50 – $750n/a
≤ 2 ozDrug petty offensenone100n/a
Public consumption, display, use
< 2 ozDrug petty offenseUp to 24 hours community service100n/a
> 2 oz – 6 ozSee: Possession

Note: All controlled substance charges also include a drug offender surcharge in addition to the fines listed.

Applicable Federal Sanctions

Sanctions are taken from this Drug Enforcement Agency document

CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE – FEDERAL SANCTIONS

    

Drug/Schedule

Quantity

Penalties

Quantity

Penalties
Cocaine (schedule II)500-4999 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
5 kgs or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Cocaine Base (schedule II)28-279 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
280 grams or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Fentanyl (schedule II)40-399 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
400 grams or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Fentanyl Analogue (schedule I)10-99 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
100 grams or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Heroin (schedule I)100-999 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
1 kg or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
LSD (schedule I)1-9 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
10 grams or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Methamphetamine (schedule II)5-49 grams pure or 50-499 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
50 grams or more pure or 500 grams or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
PCP (schedule II)10-99 grams pure or 100-999 grams mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.

Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
100 grams or more pure or 1kg or more mixtureFirst offense: Not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not less than 20 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 if not an individual.

Two or more prior offenses:
Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.

PENALTIES

Other schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)Any amountFirst offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not more than 30 years. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)1 gramFirst offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second offense: Not more than 30 years. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.
Other Schedule III drugsAny amountFirst offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more than 15 years. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.
Second offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 years. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
All other schedule IV drugsAny amountFirst offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more than 15 years. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.
Second offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 years. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
Flunitrazepam (schedule IV)Other than 1 gram or moreFirst offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.
Second offense: Not more than 10 years. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.
All schedule V drugsAny amountFirst offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.
Second offense: Not more than 10 years. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

MARIJUANA – FEDERAL SANCTIONS

       

Drug

Quantity

First Offense

Second Offense*

Marijuana (schedule I)1,000 kg or more marijuana mixture; or 1,000 or more marijuana plantsNot less than 10 years or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 years, or more than life. Fine not more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual.Not less than 20 years or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (schedule I)100 kg to 999 kg marijuana mixture; or 100 to 999 marijuana plantsNot less than 5 years or more than 40 years. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 years or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual.Not less than 10 years or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (schedule I)More than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg marijuana mixtureNot less than 20 years. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 years or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.Not less than 30 years. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (schedule I)Less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight) marijuana plants;

1 to 49 marijuana plants
Not less than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual.Not less than 10 years. Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual.
Hashish (schedule I)10 kg or less
Hashish oil (schedule I)1 kg or less

* The minimum sentence for a violation after two or more prior convictions for a felony drug offense have become
final is a mandatory term of life imprisonment without release and a fine up to $20 million if an individual and
$75 million if other than an individual.

Alcohol 

Substance Description  

Alcohol (ethanol) is a psychoactive drug that is the active ingredient in drinks such as beer, wine, and distilled spirits (hard liquor). It is possible to overdose and die from ingestion of alcohol. 

Risk of Dependence 

Risk of alcohol dependence is influenced by a variety of factors, including: how much and how often a person drinks, a persons age, health history and family history with alcohol dependence.

Short-term Effects 

Alcohol enters your bloodstream as soon as you take your first sip. Alcohol’s immediate effects can appear within about 10 minutes. As you drink, you increase your blood alcohol concentration (BAC), which is the amount of alcohol present in your bloodstream. The higher your BAC, the more impaired you become by alcohol’s effects. Alcohol interferes with the brain’s communication pathways and can affect the way the brain looks and works. These effects can include: reduced inhibitions, slurred speech, motor impairment, confusion, memory problems, concentration problems, coma, breathing problems, and even death. 

Additionally, drinking too much can weaken your immune system, making your body a much easier target for disease.  People who drink chronically are more liable to contract diseases like pneumonia and tuberculosis than people who do not drink too much.    

Long-term Effects 

Drinking a lot on a single occasion slows your body’s ability to ward off infections – even up to 24 hours after getting drunk. Drinking too much – on a single occasion or over time – can take a serious toll on your health. Some long-term effects on the body include: serious heart, liver and pancreas problems.

Additionally, based on extensive reviews of research studies, there is a strong scientific consensus of an association between alcohol drinking and several types of cancer. Clear patterns have emerged between alcohol consumption and the development of the head and neck, esophageal, liver, breast, and colorectal cancers. 


Tobacco/Nicotine  

Substance Description 

Tobacco is a plant grown for its leaves, which are dried and fermented before being put in tobacco products. Tobacco contains nicotine, an ingredient that can lead to addiction, which is why so many people who use tobacco find it difficult to quit. There are also many other potentially harmful chemicals found in tobacco or created by burning it. In recent years, vaping nicotine has become a popular method of use, especially in adolescents. In many vaping devices, puffing activates the battery-powered heating device, which vaporizes the liquid in the cartridge. The person then inhales the resulting aerosol.  

Risk of Dependence 

Nicotine in any form is a highly addictive drug. Research suggests it can even prime the brain’s reward system, putting the user at risk for addiction to other drugs. For adolescents, this risk is higher due to interference with the developing brain.   

Short-Term Effects 

The nicotine in any tobacco product readily absorbs into the blood when a person uses it. Upon entering the blood, nicotine immediately stimulates the adrenal glands to release the hormone epinephrine (adrenaline). Epinephrine stimulates the central nervous system and increases blood pressure, breathing, and heart rate. As with drugs such as cocaine and heroin, nicotine activates the brain’s reward circuits and also increases levels of the chemical messenger dopamine, which reinforces rewarding behaviors. Studies suggest that other chemicals in tobacco smoke, such as acetaldehyde, may enhance nicotine’s effects on the brain.  

Long-term Effects 

Although nicotine is addictive, most of the severe health effects of tobacco use comes from other chemicals. Tobacco smoking can lead to lung cancer, chronic bronchitis emphysema, increased the risk of heart disease. Smoking has also been linked to other cancers, leukemia, cataracts, Type 2 Diabetes, and pneumonia. All of these risks apply to use of any smoked product, including hookah tobacco. Smokeless tobacco increases the risk of cancer, especially mouth cancers. 

Pregnant women who smoke cigarettes run an increased risk of miscarriage, stillborn or premature infants, or infants with low birth weight. Smoking while pregnant may also be associated with learning and behavioral problems in exposed children. 

Secondhand smoke exposure can also lead to lung cancer and heart disease. It can cause health problems in both adults and children, such as coughing, phlegm, reduced lung function, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Children exposed to secondhand smoke are at an increased risk of ear infections, severe asthma, lung infections, and death from sudden infant death syndrome. 

Nicotine also affects the development of brain circuits that control attention and learning. Other risks include mood disorders and permanent problems with impulse control (failure to fight an urge or impulse that may harm oneself or others).


Cannabis/Marijuana 

Substance Description  

Cannabis/Marijuana is a mind-altering (psychoactive) drug, produced by the Cannabis sativa plant. Cannabis/marijuana has over 480 constituents. THC (delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol) is believed to be the main ingredient that produces the psychoactive effect.  

Risk of Dependence 

Long term, regular use can lead to physical dependence and withdrawal following discontinuation, as well as psychological addiction or dependence.  

Short-term Effects 

Short-term effects of cannabis/marijuana include problems with memory and learning, difficulty in thinking and problem solving, loss of coordination, feeling tired, bloodshot eyes, increased heart rate, lung irritation, increased appetite, and increased blood pressure (although prolonged use may cause an overall decrease in blood pressure).

Long-term Effects 

Marijuana smokers experience serious health problems such as bronchitis, emphysema, and bronchial asthma. Extended use may cause suppression of the immune system.  


Depressants 

Substance Description 

Depressants will induce sleep, relieve anxiety and muscle spasms, and prevent seizures. Barbiturates are older drugs and include: Butalbital (Fiorina®), Phenobarbital, Pentothal®,  Seconal®, Nembutal®.  

Benzodiazepines were developed to replace barbiturates, though they still share many of the undesirable side effects including tolerance and dependence. Some examples include: Valium®, Xanax®, Halcion®, Ativan®, Klonopin®, Restoril®. 

Rohypnol® is a benzodiazepine that is not manufactured or legally marketed in the United States, but it is used illegally. Lunesta®, Ambien®, and Sonata® are sedative-hypnotic medications approved for the short-term treatment of insomnia that share many of the properties of benzodiazepines.  It is possible to overdose and die from ingestion of barbiturates and benzodiazepines when used with opiates.

Risk of Dependence  

A person can rapidly develop dependence on and tolerance to barbiturates, meaning a person needs more and more of them to feel and function normally. This makes them unsafe, increasing the likelihood of coma or death. 

Benzodiazepines were developed to replace barbiturates, though they still share many of the undesirable side effects including tolerance and dependence. Prolonged use of depressants can lead to physical dependence even at doses recommended for medical treatment.  

Short-term Effects 

Most CNS depressants act on the brain by increasing activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a chemical that inhibits brain activity. This action causes the drowsy and calming effects that make the medicine effective for anxiety and sleep disorders. People who start taking CNS depressants usually feel sleepy and uncoordinated for the first few days until the body adjusts to these side effects. Other effects from use and misuse can include slurred speech, confusion, poor concentration, confusion, head ache, light-headedness, dizziness, dry mouth, problems with movement and memory, lowered blood pressure and slowed breathing.  

Long-term Effects  

If a person takes depressants long term, they might need larger doses to achieve therapeutic effects. Continued use can also lead to dependence and withdrawal when use is abruptly reduced or stopped. Suddenly stopping can also lead to harmful consequences like seizures. 


Hallucinogens  

Substance Description 

Hallucinogens are found in plants and fungi or are synthetically produced and are among the oldest known group of drugs used for their ability to alter human perception and mood. Deaths exclusively from acute overdose of LSD, magic mushrooms, and mescaline are extremely rare. Deaths generally occur due to suicide, accidents, and dangerous behavior, or due to the person inadvertently eating poisonous plant material. Hallucinogens are split into two categories: classic hallucinogens and dissociative drugs. Some examples of classic hallucinogens include: Psilocybin (Magic Mushrooms), MDMA (Ecstasy), LSD (Acid), and DMT. Some examples of dissociative drugs include: PCP, Ketamine, and Salvia 

Risk of Dependence 

Evidence suggests that certain hallucinogens can be addictive, and that people can develop a tolerance to them. For example, LSD is not considered an addictive drug because it doesn’t cause uncontrollable drug-seeking behavior. However, LSD does produce tolerance, so some users who take the drug repeatedly must take higher doses to achieve the same effect. This is an extremely dangerous practice, given the unpredictability of the drug. In addition, LSD produces tolerance to other hallucinogens, including psilocybin. 

The misuse and addiction potential of DMT is currently unknown. Unlike other hallucinogens, DMT does not appear to lead to tolerance. There is also little evidence that taking it in the form of ayahuasca tea can lead to addiction. On the other hand, PCP is a hallucinogen that can be addictive. People who stop repeated use of PCP experience drug cravings, headaches, and sweating as common withdrawal symptoms. More research is needed on the tolerance or addiction potential of a variety of hallucinogens.  

Short-term Effects 

Classic hallucinogens can cause users to see images, hear sounds, and feel sensations that seem real but do not exist. The effects generally begin within 20 to 90 minutes and can last as long as 12 hours in some cases (LSD) or as short as 15 minutes in others (synthetic DMT).  Along with hallucinations, other short-term general effects include: increased heart rate, nausea, intensified feelings, and sensory experiences (such as seeing brighter colors) changes in sense of time (for example, the feeling that time is passing by slowly).

Specific short-term effects of some hallucinogens include: increased blood pressure, increased breathing rate, increased body temperature, loss of appetite, dry mouth, sleep problems, spiritual experiences, feelings of relaxation, uncoordinated movements, excessive sweating, panic, paranoia (extreme and unreasonable distrust of others), psychosis (disordered thinking detached from reality), bizarre behaviors, and vomiting  

Long-term Effects 

Two long-term effects have been associated with use of classic hallucinogens, although these effects are rare. 

The first is called Persistent Psychosis which is a series of continuing mental problems, including: visual disturbances, disorganized thinking, paranoia, and mood changes. 

The second is called Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD). This manifests in recurrences of certain drug experiences, such as hallucinations or other visual disturbances. These flashbacks often happen without warning and may occur within a few days or more than a year after drug use. These symptoms are sometimes mistaken for other disorders, such as stroke or a brain tumor.    


Narcotics/Opioids  

Substance Description 

Also known as “opioids,” the term “narcotic” comes from the Greek word for “stupor” and originally referred to a variety of substances that dulled the senses and relieved pain. Though some people still refer to all drugs as “narcotics,” today “narcotic” refers to opium, opium derivatives, and their semi-synthetic substitutes. A more current term for these drugs, with less uncertainty regarding its meaning, is “opioid.” Examples include: heroin, OxyContin®, Vicodin®, Codeine, Morphine, Fentanyl, and Methadone. It is possible and common to overdose and die from ingestion of opioids.

Risk of Dependence 

Use can create psychological dependence. Long after the physical need for the drug has passed, the user may continue to think and talk about using drugs and feel overwhelmed coping with daily activities. Relapse is common if there are not changes to the physical environment or the behavioral motivators that prompted the abuse in the first place.   

Short-term Effects 

In the short term, opioids can relieve pain and make people feel relaxed and happy. However, opioids can also have harmful effects, including: drowsiness, confusion, nausea, constipation, euphoria, and slowed breathing.   

Long-term Effects 

Opioid misuse can cause slowed breathing, which can cause hypoxia, a condition that results when too little oxygen reaches the brain. Hypoxia can have short- and long-term psychological and neurological effects, including coma, permanent brain damage, or death. Researchers are also investigating the long-term effects of opioid addiction on the brain, including whether damage can be reversed. People who use opioids over the long term may develop insomnia, collapsed veins at injection sites, damaged tissue in nose from snorting, heart lining and valve infection, abscesses, constipation and stomach cramps, liver and kidney disease, pneumonia, depression and other mental illness, sexual dysfunction, and issues with menstrual cycles.  


Stimulants 

Substance Description  

Stimulants speed up the body’s systems. This class of drugs includes prescription and illicit stimulants. Prescription stimulants include amphetamines (Adderall® and Dexedrine®), methylphenidate (Concerta® and Ritalin®), and diet aids (such as Didrex®). Illicit stimulants include methamphetamine, cocaine, methcathinone, and synthetic cathinones that are commonly sold under the guise of “bath salts”.  It is possible and common to overdose and die from ingestion of stimulants.  

Risk of Dependence 

Tolerance, in which more and more drug is needed to produce the usual effects, can develop rapidly, and psychological dependence occurs. In fact, the strongest psychological dependence observed occurs with the more potent stimulants, such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, methamphetamine, cocaine, and methcathinone. Abrupt cessation is commonly followed by depression, anxiety, drug craving, and extreme fatigue, known as a “crash.” 

Short-term Effects 

People who use stimulants report feeling a “rush” (euphoria) along with the following increased blood pressure heart rate and breathing, decreased blood flow, increased blood sugar, dilated pupils, nausea, increased body temperature, restlessness, tremors and muscle twitches.

Long-term Effects 

Repeated misuse of stimulants, even within a short period, can cause psychosis, anger, or paranoia.  If the drug is injected, it is important to note that sharing drug injection equipment and having impaired judgment from drug misuse can increase the risk of contracting infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis. 

For methamphetamine, some long-term effects include extreme weight loss, addiction, severe dental problems “meth mouth”), intense itching leading to skin sores, anxiety, changes in brain structure and function, confusion, memory loss, sleeping problems, violent behavior, paranoia, and hallucinations.  

For cocaine, long-term effects are dependent on method of use: Snorting can result in loss of smell, nosebleeds, frequent runny nose, and problems swallowing. Smoking can result in cough, asthma, respiratory distress, and higher risk of lung infections like pneumonia. Consuming by mouth can cause severe bowel decay from reduced blood flow. Needle injection can result in a higher risk for contracting HIV, hepatitis C, and other bloodborne diseases, skin and soft tissue infection, and scarring or collapsed veins at injection site.  

Students

Decreasing Risk in Vulnerable Groups – First Year Students

New, incoming students engage in the Ram Orientation Rams Take Care, Rams Take Action session that integrates alcohol norming and bystander messaging. Ram Orientation Leaders are trained in program content, motivational interviewing, bystander intervention and practical skills for program delivery.

Ram Orientation CSU Health Network Parent and Family Presentations provide requirements, recommendations and services information, as well as encourage prevention-focused conversations with their new students. Parent and Family Programs follow-up communications provide resources on how to support their student and conversation guidance.

Ram Orientation has an intentional focus on students building positive social connections, a substance abuse protective factor, and diversity and inclusion awareness.

The AlcoholEdu online module is required for new, incoming students under the age of 23 to facilitate healthier decisions related to alcohol and drug use. Module components include the setting of expectations and norms clarification, as well as providing personalized feedback and tailored content that engages abstainers, light to moderate users and frequent users with customized messaging. It also educates on the mental and physical effects of substance use and alcohol poisoning, as well as prepares students to engage in active bystander behavior. The module was updated with vaping and marijuana prevention education in Summer 2020.

YOU@CSU is an online student success portal (https://you.colostate.edu/) that connects students to personalized campus and online resources and support services in the areas of Succeed (Academics/Career), Thrive (Physical/Mental Health) and Matter (Purpose/Connection) to make the most of their college experience. This includes screening questions related to substance use that help dial up timely education and support resources. Incoming students are encouraged to create a profile and explore.

Student staff trainings are provided to Ram Orientation Leaders, Resident Assistants and University Housing Support Staff, Student Media and other mentoring groups regarding their role in creating an environment that encourages healthy decisions around alcohol and other drugs. Trainings can include brief motivational interviewing skills to help have critical conversations with students they serve, active bystander techniques, harm reduction education and referral.

University Housing staff work to create community with their yearly influx of new and returning students and offer Living Substance Free floors in the residence halls. As part of their CSU Police Department Officer Liaison program, each residence hall is assigned an officer with the intention of forming relationships and building trust. Students become accustomed to seeing the officers, associating them less with just policy violation response.

Early in the Fall semester, a Setting Expectations Campaign within University Housing is mobilized, in follow up to housing contract signing. The campaign provides clear messaging about campus alcohol and other drug policies and violation, as well as messaging to reinforce AlcoholEdu content related to how to help a friend with alcohol poisoning and promotion of Responsible Action/Medical Exemption policy.

Fraternity and Sorority Life Community

The GreekLifeEdu online module completion is required by most fraternity and sorority chapters by their (inter)national organization.

The Fraternity and Sorority Life Harm Reduction and Risk Management Workgroup focuses on exploration, implementation and updates to harm reduction and prevention strategies specific to the fraternity and sorority community. There is promotion of resources, grounded in harm reduction, for chapters to utilize when planning social events with alcohol. These resources include: (1) third party vendor contracting, (2) event monitoring, (3) tailgate event planning and (4) BYOB guest list strategy.

There is intentional follow-up regarding violation of alcohol-related policies and online publishing of fraternity and sorority organization conduct outcomes.

The Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life provides a risk management officer workshop on a variety of harm reduction related topics, with at least once per year, Fall semester, a workshop focused on alcohol abuse prevention. Additionally, workshops have been hosted on marijuana abuse prevention and social event management.

 The Tailgating Summit, started in Fall 2017, engages the fraternity and sorority community in discussing tailgate event strategies for harm reduction and safer behavior.

Broader than the Fraternity and Sorority Life community, CSU provides hazing prevention training, messaging and encourages reporting of incidents. Fraternity and Sorority Life specific resources can be found at their hazing prevention website.

Athletes

Substance abuse prevention messaging and support resource information is embedded into the first-year athlete course curriculum messaging and orientation.

CSU adheres to the NCAA athlete alcohol and other drug testing protocol.

There is a CSU Health Network counselor embedded in Athletics to actively assist with student athlete and coach education and student mental health/substance abuse support.

High Risk Times/Events

The Community Welcome event held early Fall helps foster a sense of community and connection between students and long-term Fort Collins residents. Volunteers made up of CSU students and staff, city employees, and Fort Collins and CSU Police go door-to- door visiting approximately 2,000 homes in neighborhoods surrounding the main campus. Teams distribute information about City ordinances and expectations CSU has for its students. Additionally, the teams encourage neighbors to get out and meet each other, providing residents with the “Art of Neighboring” brochure as well as exchange names and contact information to create positive relationships.

 The Party Registration program provides party hosts with an opportunity to receive a warning, giving a 20-minute window to voluntarily terminate a party after a noise complaint has been received. Party smart tips and resources are provided upon registration.

CSU campus administrators and Public Safety Team typically distribute harm reduction and expectation-setting health messaging at the start/end of school year, as well as before the Rocky Mountain Showdown football game with CU-Boulder, Halloween and Spring Break. These events are known to be higher risk for alcohol misuse and related impacts.

Fort Collins Police/CSU Police Department engage in joint party patrols, DUI saturation patrols, compliance checks during the year, with greater emphasis early Fall, around Halloween and late Spring.

CSU sporting events substance abuse and related issues prevention includes: (1) pre- event/tailgating/same day policy communications, (2) limiting hours of sales at venues, (3) server training and (4) game day protocols and policy enforcement.

The Football Game Bystander Intervention builds upon bystander education as part of Ram Orientation and AlcoholEdu. The CREWS Peer Education team engages student football game attendees in conversations using brief motivational interviewing and pledging shown to foster bystander behavior and harm reduction.

There is intentional campus creation and promotion of activities at higher risk times, like Ram Welcome. An example is the First 50 Days that involves University Housing’s integration of activities for students to engage in during their first eight weeks on campus.

The CSU RamRide program provides free, safe rides for CSU students. The community of Fort Collins has a late-night bus route.

Outreach

CREWS Peer Education and Manager of Substance Misuse Prevention and Assessment provides alcohol, marijuana and tobacco/vaping presentations and outreach, using best practices for content and delivery. Substance Abuse Prevention staff continue to work collaboratively with campus mental health and well-being colleagues to foster healthy coping strategies and skill-building.

Help-Seeking, Treatment and Recovery

DAY Programs (Drugs, Alcohol and You) are specialty counseling services offered through the Health Network. DAY serves students who are concerned about their substance use or are required to complete an assessment or engage in treatment by the university’s disciplinary system.

DAY offers five specialized programs:

  • Live Safe is a three‐hour education and discussion group for students who want to learn more about substance use or those who have had a conduct
  • BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students) involves an online assessment of your substance use history and Individualized feedback is provided during an initial appointment and one follow‐up meeting with a counselor. Students may initiate the screen themselves or are referred by the conduct office.
  • Taking Steps provides weekly group support for students making changes in their use of drugs and This program is open to those voluntarily seeking help and those mandated to treatment by the conduct system.
  • Open to Change is an eight‐week program for students who both voluntarily complete the program or are mandated by the university to complete the Students achieve eight consecutive weeks of abstinence with individual and group counseling.
  • Back on TRAC is an abstinence‐based, drug court program for students with serious alcohol or drug violations who are mandated to complete the program or would otherwise be dismissed from the

In addition to these programs, individual counseling is available for students who want to examine and alter their substance use. DAY works with students whose goals range from reducing the negative impact of substance use to abstinence. Counselors use a nonjudgmental and empathic approach to support students in achieving their goals.

Students with a Conduct Code violation related to alcohol and/or other substances are sanctioned to complete the Basics online assessment through CSU Health Network Drugs, Alcohol, and You (DAY) Program, which helps to determine the most appropriate level of intervention. DAY works with sanctioned and non- sanctioned students across the spectrum of use, including addiction. See this website for detailed information about DAY Program offerings.

 Tobacco cessation support resources are available for both students and employees. For more information please visit  https://tobaccofree.colostate.edu/quitting-resources/

Online screening tools are accessible through the YOU@CSU portal to assess symptoms of substance abuse and distress and encourage help seeking behaviors.

Ram Recovery Community, founded in 2017, provides peer support for students on all paths and in all phases of recovery including substance use disorders, eating disorders, as well as process and other mental health disorders. Weekly meetings are available in in-person and virtual format, for more information of this student organization please visit their website.  

Starting Fall 2022, Ram Recovery will be offering recovery ally training on a regular basis. Recovery ally training covers topics such as: combatting stigma, person-first language, holistic paths of recovery, and tangible ways to be an effective ally. Calendar details for trainings will be available at the beginning of the Fall 2022 semester.

Naloxone and Overdose prevention trainings are available through a collaborative partnership with other local organizations. The training provides information on harm reduction and training on how to administer naloxone in a potential overdose emergency. For more information about the initiative please visit: https://health.colostate.edu/fentanyl-information-and-safety-tips/

More information about alcohol and drugs educational programs and individual assistance: 

 CSU Health Network 

 (970) 491‐7121  

www.health.colostate.edu  

Employees

CSU Employee Drug, Alcohol Treatment and Educational Programs  

Colorado State University’s Employee Assistance Program offers on-site assessment and referrals, 3rd party counseling, and support in linking to treatment and counseling for employees struggling with mental health and substance related issues. More information can be found at the Employee Assistance Program website

A CSU employee can learn more about the Employee Assistance Program and engage in services by contacting the Employee Assistance Coordinator at 970-491-3437 or email Jan Pierce

More information about community resources can be obtained by viewing the CARE Program website or contacting the Community Resources Coordinator by phone at 970-491-4839 or email Emma Chavez

State of Colorado policy is that treatment may be more appropriate for alcoholics and intoxicated individuals than criminal prosecution. Employees should be afforded a continuum of treatment to help them lead normal lives as productive members of society [C.R.S. §27‐81‐ 101(1)].  

The state supports the following kinds of treatment facilities and services[C.R.S. §27‐81‐101(2)]: 

  • Screening centers for alcoholics  
  • Medical detoxification  
  • Intensive treatment  
  • Halfway‐house care  
  • Outpatient rehabilitative therapy, orientation, education, and in‐service training  
  • Patient transportation  

To find a mental health or substance abuse treatment facility in your area, visit this list.

More resources on health effects, usage trends, and marijuana regulation:  

Students  

All CSU students are required to comply with the Student Conduct Code which sets behavior expectations for students, including expectations regarding drug and alcohol use.  

The Student Conduct Code prohibits student use, possession, manufacturing, and distribution of illegal drugs. This includes:   

  • Misuse of alcohol
  • Prescription drugs used in a manner other than as prescribed  
  • Marijuana and its derivatives, in any form  
  • Narcotics, methamphetamine, cocaine, opiates, LSD, mushrooms, heroin, designer drugs such as Ecstasy and GHB, and other controlled substances  
  • Drug paraphernalia including but not limited to equipment, products, and materials used to cultivate, manufacture, distribute, or use illegal drugs  

The Student Conduct Code applies to student behaviors on and off campus. If a student is found to have violated drug or alcohol conduct expectations, the student may be subject to discipline under the Student Conduct Code, as well as criminal prosecution under federal and state laws. Sanctions include disciplinary probation, loss of good standing, suspension, deferred suspension, and even expulsion. Student organizations can lose official recognition. Academic penalties can include grading penalties and permanent transcript notations. Housing modifications and parental notification are possible sanctions for policy violations. Educational programs and workshops may be assigned. The student has a right to appeal the hearing officer’s decision. CSU, through its University Housing Office, Office of Student Conduct Services and CSU Police Department, vigorously enforces state underage drinking laws; local, state and federal drug laws and the Student Conduct Code. 

Employees  

The university may properly intervene when employee use of alcohol or drugs affects job performance and conduct. Employees covered by this policy may not report to work or be at work while impaired by alcohol or drugs, even those lawfully prescribed, as determined under a reasonable suspicion standard.  

Employees who violate the university’s policies concerning illicit drugs face discipline outlined in university policies and procedures. Employees may also be subject to criminal prosecution under federal and state laws for drug‐ related criminal offenses.  

No member of the academic community (faculty members, administrative professionals, staff, and students) may unlawfully possess, use, manufacture, dispense, or distribute controlled substances, illicit drugs, or alcohol on University property or as a part of any University activity.  University policy also prohibits the performance of one’s duties while impaired by the use of alcohol or drugs.  The University, through its established committees and procedures, will impose sanctions on students and employees found to be in violation of this policy, possibly including, but not limited to, one (1) or more of the following: reprimand, probation, expulsion, eliminating or lowering salary increases for a period of time, temporary suspension with or without pay, termination, and referral to civil authorities for prosecution consistent with local, State, and Federal law and University policy. University employees who are convicted under a criminal drug statute for an act in violation of this policy must report the conviction to the Executive Director of the Department of Human Resources, in writing within five (5) days. The University will annually inform faculty members, administrative professionals, staff, and students of applicable health risks, counseling, treatment, rehabilitation or reentry programs, and applicable local, State, and Federal law on unlawful possession or distribution of drugs and alcohol.

Colorado Immunity from Arrest and Prosecution Law  

Colorado law protects people from criminal prosecution for certain drug and alcohol violations if they call for help in an alcohol‐ or drug‐related emergency, including marijuana (C.R.S. §18‐1‐ 711). The caller will be immune from criminal prosecution if they comply with the following: 

  • The caller must provide their name to police or emergency medical services 
  • The caller must remain on scene until help arrives 
  • The caller must cooperate with police and emergency medical services  
  • Immunity also extends to the person in need of medical attention if that person complies with these same requirements  

CSU Responsible Action Exemption Policy for Students  

Students or organizations, both on and off campus, who seek medical attention for themselves or on behalf of another student related to the use of drugs or alcohol will not be charged with violations of the Student Conduct Code related to that incident.  

  • The student seeking exemption for the emergency must comply with the recommendations of the Student Conduct Services hearing officer. These may include an assessment related to drug or alcohol use and treatment recommendations, among others. 
  • Failure to complete an assessment may result in charges against the student filed with Student Conduct Services. 
  • The parents or guardians of students may be notified by the university if a student involved in the situation is younger than 21 and was transported to the hospital for medical attention.  
  • More information on the policy https://resolutioncenter.colostate.edu/sc-procedures/.   

Marijuana Use and Possession on Campus 

The use and possession of marijuana is prohibited on all property owned or controlled by the university and during all activities sponsored by the university, wherever located. The potential health and behavioral impacts of marijuana do not fit with CSU’s mission as an academic institution and a safe, fast‐ paced, high‐functioning work environment. Federal agencies continue to enforce federal law against those who facilitate the illegal use of marijuana, despite state law. 

Colorado constitution amendment 64 legalizes certain activities related to marijuana under Colorado law, yet amendment 64 specifically authorizes the university – as a school and an employer – to prohibit the possession and use of marijuana. In addition, although amendment 64 passed in Colorado, marijuana remains illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act, which prohibits marijuana possession and use. This federal law applies to recreational and medical uses of marijuana. It is not a defense that the person holds a medical marijuana card. Students and employees who violate this policy are subject to university discipline.  

Federal laws such as the Drug‐Free Workplace Act and the Drug‐Free Schools and Communities Act also restrict use of marijuana in the workplace. These federal laws require the university to prohibit the use of marijuana on campus. The Colorado State University Police Department, along with Student Conduct Services, enforces the campus‐wide prohibition of marijuana. CSU strives to maintain a safe workplace. Employees who are under the influence of marijuana, just like with alcohol, create serious safety risks when operating machinery or working with potentially hazardous materials or substances in the workplace.  While performing their job duties:  

  • CSU employees are prohibited from consulting or assisting with the cultivation, sale, distribution, or use of marijuana.  
  • Any employee who provides such assistance shall be acting outside the scope of his or her employment and assumes personal liability for such action.  
  • CSU is not required to accommodate an employee’s medical or recreational use of marijuana.  
  • Illegal drug use is a bar to acquisition or renewal of a federal security clearance. 

To comply with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, in addition to the annual notice of our Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program above, every two years an IHE must conduct a review of its alcohol and other drug program to determine effectiveness and the consistency of sanction enforcement, in order to identify and implement any necessary changes. The 2020 Biennial Review is available for download here